Vine

How Short Videos Tell You More

Most people hesitate to do video because they are worried about having to create 1) long narratives with 2) high production value.

That said, we’ve noticed a cool phenomoenon: very short videos in places you aren’t expecting them.

I first noticed this while online shopping. When I look at clothing websites, a lot of them have short videos showing how the clothing drapes and moves, which is really helpful. It also helps higher quality items stand out in a sea of cheap clothing websites where people don’t feel the get what they are paying for. Here’s an example from Universal Standard:

Product Video Example From Online Store from Nicole Ouellette on Vimeo.

I was telling a friend about this short video observation and she mentioned online dating websites adding short video formats as part of profiles and she was considering trying it. Of course, this made me think about this:

Really though, it’s daters answering questions, which can honestly give you a lot better idea of what they will be like in real life than tons of verbage in a profile can.

Vine (8 second videos) have gone away and with Instagram allowing 60 second (or less) videos, it might just be that the internet is a big experiment in the ideal length of short videos and what they can accomplish in that time. How short is too short? What kinds of information can be shown that would be difficult to show in another medium? I personally think we are just getting started.



Nonprofits can also benefit from using short videos. This example is from Friends of Acadia sharing the conditions of the trail at the Jesup Path. If you check out their video archive, you’ll find their weather related updates about trails and conditions are fairly short (less than a minute in length). Maine Coast Heritage Trust uses short videos in a similar way. (These videos all use raw footage- no editing, and no one having to worry about talking for the camera).

Wyman’s of Maine (the blueberry factory where Kassie worked in high school) shares a lot of short videos like these, sharing how to make smoothies and other treats using their products. Yes, there is a bit of production with this video, but you’ll notice there’s no one talking in front of a camera, and the editing can probably be done using a relatively inexpensive service.

The Museum of Modern Art (MoMA) in NYC uses short video clips to offer glimpses of the space, discussions with authors, and closer looks at exhibits. Their video archives have a mix of short videos and longer form (up to 10 minutes).

If you have a cool product, a cool location, or a mission that supports cool activities, short videos are a marketing tool that you can definitely use. Short and sweet applies to online video, and your projects too.

Where else have you seen short form videos? Are you planning on using these in your marketing?



Marketing Monday: Flavor God

I am in my usual ‘fall as new year’ kick and have been following the Whole30 for about 4 days. Last night, in an attempt to crisp up green beans so they would function even a little bit like the crunchy snack I actually wanted, I realized to get through the next month, I’d have to get a lot more into seasonings.

I’ve been following Flavor God, first on Instagram and then a few other places. I want to talk a little big about what is going right with this product:



Super Short Videos

Many videos are 15 seconds or less and can be watched with or without sound:

VIdeos are oftentimes short and look delicious. Vine (and share) worthy.

Videos are oftentimes short and look delicious. Vine (and share) worthy.

Creating Scarcity

FlavorGod often has flash sales. I even saw a Facebook ad (which I forgot to screenshot) telling me I had 13 minutes to act on a package deal.

flavorgod-creatingscarcityWhen things are constantly available, there is not incentive to act. By periodically retiring and re-releasing spices, Flavor God not only has new things to say but allows his customers to act.

Differentiation

I am pretty clear on Flavor God’s value proposition. His spices are larger, freshly made, endorsed by celebrity chefs/bloggers and otherwise seem different to what is readily available at the supermarket.

Part of the value proposition is the fact that Flavor God spices are larger than major brands.

Part of the value proposition is the fact that Flavor God spices are larger than major brands.

Flavor God regularly illustrates what is valuable about his products, which justify a higher price point and the hassle of having to order them.

Master Of The Feedback Collage

I’m going to say it, this is slightly cheesy but like most slightly cheesy things, people like it:

flavorgod-testimonialcollage

Flavor God regularly not only posts tweets but photos of his customers with the product. Not just celebrities but also normal people and tags them when possible.

Best Emoji Use/Overuse

What first stood out when I began following Flavor God was his borderline aggressive emoji use. Here’s a recent Instagram post to show you what I mean.

flavorgod-emoji

Attentive Of The Marketplace

This is the footer of FlavorGod.com:

flavorgod-diets

Did Flavor God have to go through extra trouble to make vegan approved seasonings? Maybe, maybe not. But by communicating they work with a vegan diet, he is attracting those customers to his store. By being attentive of the current popular eating trends (gluten free, Whole30, paleo), he is able to have a product not only make food taste better but address the needs of the different dietary communities.





He’s Not Afraid To Ask For The Sale

What I love the most about Flavor God? He asks for the sale. He regularly gives his online store’s URL, he asks people to buy, and even reminds people that he ships worldwide (and other potential barriers to sale) in just about every post.

He doesn’t ask once (like some of us writing this blog) and feel too embarassed to ask more than once in awhile. he asks, regularly. He answers the same questions over and over, with a patience and enthusiasm that’s admirable.

Flavor God, I’m going to buy some of your stuff. Your online marketing is certainly impressive!

www.flavorgod.com

https://instagram.com/flavorgod/

https://www.facebook.com/FlavorGod

 

 

 

Chef: The Best Movie About Social Networking I’ve Seen

I’m one of those people who enjoys learning more about my topic when I am off the job. I read social media books and magazines… and have even tried to watch “Helvetica” (a movie about the font).

I just couldn’t do “Helvetica”… it was too cerebral for me. There are enough things in my life that make me feel dumb that I didn’t make myself watch this movie.

When I agreed to watch “Chef” on Saturday night with my friend Megan and her daughter, I thought I was watching a movie about a five star chef who ends up with a food truck. I wasn’t expecting so much of it to be about social networking. Here’s what I liked about it.

Chef Takeaway 1: It didn’t treat Twitter like Facebook’s ugly stepsister.

In this movie, Twitter plays a main role, some critics say it’s a ridiculously large role but I appreciated that this movie showed how Twitter works and why it’s powerful/cool. Bonus points for seeing the tweets being typed in and then having them turn into a bird an ‘tweet’ off into the world as they were sent.

tweetsinchef

Chef Takeaway 2: It touched on a bunch of social networks. 

Sometimes movies about blogging (I’m looking at you ‘Julie and Julia’) make the main character blogger sit at their computer for hours on end, tortured by the writing process.

Here’s the thing. Some of us are writers (I say us because I am literally typing this with a big smile on my face) and some are not. In this movie, we’re not only introduced to short form writing (tweets) but also other media like Youtube and Vine.

The range of what could be possible is enough to give the movie watcher a sense of what is possible but doesn’t go into the ‘how’ enough to overwhelm people.

Chef Takeaway 3: Your kid can do your social networking…kind of.

There’s always some extremely rude person who tells me after a presentation that their kid can do what I do. (Kind of insulting since I don’t walk up to THEM and tell them a kid could do their job but that’s besides the point.)

Here’s the thing about this movie: the kid is PASSIONATE about the business. That’s why he does a good job marketing it. It’s not that he’s young and up with technology (though that helps). I’m of the mindset that if you are open to learning and passionate about what you do, your business will do well on social media with you at the helm… though if you either a) don’t want to take care of it or b) need a little technical or other assistance, that’s what people like us are for.

So if you want to watch a movie that will make you want to tweet or eat a grilled cheese (I am still thinking about the grilled cheese in that movie), I recommend ‘Chef’. You won’t think hard necessarily or feel like you are in a social media marketing workshop but it’ll get you thinking… which, let’s face it, is pretty powerful.

Buy your copy of “Chef” on Amazon (this is an affiliate link)