online learning

Personal Development for Busy People

One of the number one reasons we don’t follow through on something is because of the time commitment it takes to get it done. We’re all busy people, so when it comes to working out, reading that book the internet is raving about, or starting up a new hobby that you think looks interesting, the number one justification is “I don’t have time for that!”

I consider myself “busy people.” Until recently I was working 2 jobs (1 full/1 part time), helping my dad with housework at his place once a week, working out regularly, and trying to have a healthy pregnancy. When I was juggling all of those things, I did still manage to find time to incorporate personal development in my schedule. Here’s how:

Listening to podcasts. Podcasts are a great way for on-the-goers to work some personal development into their day. You can listen on your commute if you’re driving, taking the bus/train, or even walking. I also like to catch up on podcasts when I’m doing chores like dishes or folding laundry. Listening to a few episodes of “Side Hustle School” makes things feel less tedious.

Reading. Probably one of the most difficult personal development mediums for me to follow through with is a book. It’s the easiest one for me to bail out on at the end of the day when I start winding down. Do I really want to read this book that’s going to make me think more after a day of thinking, or should I just watch South Park and completely veg out? Knowing that this is the easiest way for me to self-sabotage, I started bringing my book to the gym after work and reading on the elliptical. Some days I will set my alarm 15 minutes early and spend that time reading before doing my morning routine. If audio books are your thing, you can also listen to personal development books using the same tips from the podcast section above.

Please appreciate that it was very difficult to snap a picture of me reading while also maintaining balance on the elliptical.

Online Learning. To me, online learning is anything from signing up for a 30 day course of some sort, following a certain blog/topic, or enrolling in an online class. These all have varying levels of commitment, but regardless you’ll want to have an internet connection and a computer/tablet/phone so you can participate. The next is creating the time to get online solely for personal development reasons (i.e. not Facebook). For an online course, you’ll obviously need more time than reading someone else’s blog posts, which you can do standing in line for groceries or on the bike at the gym.

Asking Other People. If you’re at a loss for what podcast to listen to or what book to read next, ask someone you know who is into that sort of thing. All of the podcasts I listen to were recommended to me by someone else. When I was looking into things like personal fitness certification and starting a blog for fun/just because, I asked for recommendations for books to read and started paying more attention to different techniques/plugins used on my favorite bloggers’ websites.

What do all of these things have in common?

No matter how you decide to get your personal development fix, there are a few things you can do to set yourself up for success.

  • Know your weaknesses. For me, that’s the desire to wind down at the end of the day and watch something brainless on t.v. Knowing this, I incorporate personal development time into a workout, while I’m doing chores, or by setting my alarm earlier in the morning.
  • Find something you’re genuinely interested in. If you’re already a busy person, it’s going to be even harder to motivate when you’re dedicating time to something you have “meh” feelings about. Find something that you want to pursue and it’s amazing how much harder you’ll work to make time for it.
  • Make the time. Speaking of making time, one of my favorite time related quotes is “You have just as many hours in the day as Beyonce.” Even if it’s not an ideal amount of time, spending 10 minutes on something every day is better than spending no minutes. You can also think of personal development as a way of shortcutting your learning time because you’re learning from an expert and that will save you time and money in the long run.
  • Be Organized. One of the best tips I’ve heard from Side Hustle School was that if you’re a busy person trying to work a side hustle, organization is key. If you only have half an hour of time set aside to work on a project, have an agenda before you sit down so you can get right to it instead of spending 5-10 of those minutes hemming and hawing about where to start. Making lists at the end of a work day or as you go to bed can be a great way to have ‘what’s next’ ready to go for next time.
  • Make yourself accountable. When you’re busy, it can be easy to just say “Eh, there’s always tomorrow.” The problem is when you keep pushing things to tomorrow you’ll never get them done. Find a way to make yourself accountable for personal development- if it’s a matter of paying for something because that makes you feel accountable, then consider signing up for an online course. If you’re more accountable when it comes to other people, find a friend who also needs some accountability help and make it a weekly check-in. Click here for the blog we wrote about accountability partners if this is going to be part of your lifestyle.

More reading when I couldn’t fall back to sleep on Saturday morning. Great way to start the day!

No matter what type of personal development you’re trying to pursue, there is always a way to fit it into your schedule! Try some of the tips mentioned above and find out what motivates you.

If you have any tricks for fitting personal development into a busy schedule, or recommendations for books/podcasts/etc, please comment or send us a message!

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Kassie is a distance runner and a distance reader really. She lives in Ellsworth Maine and, while she might be quiet when you meet her, will throw out something witty when you least expect it.

Online Tutorials You Never Knew You Needed

If you’ve ever needed to find out how to do something, there’s a 95% chance you’ve referred to Google, YouTube, or somewhere on the internet to find out (note: that statistic is completely my own and based solely on observation). These searches may include how to do a side braid, deep water aqua-jogging instructions, how bad is it really if I eat bacon while pregnant, or how to change the serpentine belt in a 2011 Hyundai Accent, to name a few. In addition to these completely necessary inquiries, you may not be aware that there are questions you haven’t even thought to ask.

Besides using a search engine like Google, there are specific websites where people ask questions, get answers, and participate in a larger community of others who do the same. And while you can learn basic life lessons from these sites, there are other how-to tutorials that can make you wonder if they are legit.

For instance, did you know you can become telekinetic with the help of WikiHow? Admittedly this is a ‘results may vary’ situation as it takes years to hone this skill… or may not actually exist, depending on your belief structure.

Remember, it’s all a mental game.

Maybe you want to learn more about being random, and need some clear, not-so-random advice on how to get there.  After reading this article, hopefully you won’t need to refer to the internet for a randomness tutorial.

If you suspect you’ve been cursed, fortunately there is an article on removing black magic spells that you can refer to.

Perhaps you want to jump on a YA trend from 10 years ago. If so, “How to Write a Novel About Vampires” might be for you (and remember, “Names like Dracula sound cool but are unrealistic”). Who knows, your books could turn into a trilogy/four movies!

For general pet-lovers, there’s a lot of helpful information on animal care, including “How to Help Pets Cope with the Back-to-School Transition” (hey, it’s tough for everyone).

One of my favorites is “How to Be the Angel Child in Your Family” (I mean, I could have written this one when I was younger).

Tragically, the following articles are no longer in existence: “How to Trick People Into Thinking Your an Alien,” “How to Give Someone a Passive-Aggressive Christmas Gift,” and “How to Catch Santa Claus on Videotape” (I was actually pretty upset about the alien one).

Now there are a few websites that can help you get to even the most obscure information. Let’s get oriented.

WikiHow
Most famous for: the most ridiculous and illustrated step by step instructions ever.

WikiHow is the source of a fairly comprehensive articles on just about every topic you can imagine. They don’t say things like “Turn on your computer” when you’re reading an article about how to post to Facebook but it’s pretty darn close for that. What I do like about the site though is that it’s not ‘for dummies’ in that it doesn’t imply or even assume the person reading it is dumb, just that they don’t know something.

What I like about WikiHow is they also aren’t too precious about what they will give a tutorial for and it seems like the people writing some of them are having a genuinely fun time.

Quora
Most famous for: Questions you’re too embarrassed to ask on LinkedIn.

Quora is where you ask  business or skills questions more than “how do you change a tire” type questions. That said, it is not free from snark.

This is from Quora, which I personally appreciated as a person who knows a little code (I came into the world of websites at a time when Wordpress, Joomla, and WYSIWYG editing was in full force, so I can do a few things with code but it’s not part of daily work). Even with minimal knowledge about coding, I do appreciate the absurdity of learning any skill overnight, which is why this post has some comedic value:

 

Yahoo Answers
Most famous for: Asking your personal/life questions… sometimes into a void.

Like Quora, Yahoo Answers has a lot of “Umm…what?” questions, but there are some genuine inquiries with helpful answers that prove it isn’t all bad or weird.

It also appears to be a fairly popular place for getting help with math/science homework. Then, there’s questions like this:

Yahoo is famous though for having lots of posted questions with no answers to them or disappearing user names, making it hard to see who even asked the question in the first place.

As silly as these all these articles and questions may seem, I like to think that the majority add value to someone’s life, somehow. Like it’s easy to dismiss the laptop question but when someone mentions the weight of electrons, it can make you think of the question a different way.

Overall, it can be nice to remember just how simple the internet can be at times: people connecting with other people and sharing information, even with strangers.

With these sites, it seems nothing is off limits in terms of questions or answers (as with most forum type websites, depending on the level of monitoring). My advice, when you post a question, be prepared for all kinds of answers and potentially some trolls. But if you can tolerate some sass or an insincere answer, you may find something you didn’t even know you were looking for… in the best way.

Kassie is a distance runner and a distance reader really. She lives in Ellsworth Maine and, while she might be quiet when you meet her, will throw out something witty when you least expect it.