communication fail

Courting Controversy

A few major brands have waded into some controversial waters lately, leveraging our current national discord in order to send what is hoped to be a positive message. The results have been all over the map. Here are three recent examples:

    1. Budweiser, Born the Hard Way”

Described as “the story of our founder’s ambitious journey to America in pursuit of his dream: to brew the King of Beers,” this cinematic Super Bowl commercial drew criticism from certain folks for a perceived pro-immigrant bias, especially given that it was released around the same time the president issued an executive order regarding immigration. The hashtag #boycottbudwiser (sic) started circulating before the commercial even aired.

However, as Mashable notes the boycott largely failed, in that “The boycotters … missed the larger historical context of the Budweiser ad.”

 

      1. Pepsi, “Live For Now”

      What can be said about this ad that hasn’t already been said? Pepsi and Jenner were raked over the coals by, well, everyone, including SNL:

      The biggest complaint was that ad was tone-deaf in how it co-opped imagery from Black Lives Matter and other earnest political movements. The thinking that beautiful people drinking sugary beverages will solve the world’s problems is also flawed. In any event, “Live For Now” didn’t live for long. Pepsi wisely yanked the ad a day after its release.

  1. 3. Heineken, “Worlds Apart”

OK, so, if we take the lessons learned from both Budweiser and Pepsi, the message seems to be: Stay away from topical material to avoid ridicule and boycotts. But then along comes Heineken with this ad that takes a huge risk and somehow manages to pull it off.

Writing for The A.V. Club,Gwen Ihnat notes that by using real people, as opposed to models and actors, Heineken “very simply and succinctly accomplishes what Jenner and all those hundreds of Pepsi street-activist extras could not.”

Heineken’s strategy isn’t exactly new, argues Sarah Rense in this piece by Esquire: “It uses the reliable trope of Real People seeing something and/or someone for the first time, and then having their minds changed, mixed with a healthy dose of social awareness.” Rense also notes that, in the wake of the Pepsi debacle, Heineken had a low bar to clear: “By itself, it’s just an ad meant to sell a thing. But compared to the Pepsi ad, it deserves a Cannes Lion. Makes you smile a bit, too.”

Tapping into a nation’s divisions to sell fizzy beverages isn’t necessarily groundbreaking. Coke may have done it first with “I’d Like to Teach the World to Sing (In Perfect Harmony)” way back in 1971.

Horribly cheesy? Yes. A cynical attempt to use flower children to sell soda? Yeah, probably. Offensive? Well, I didn’t see anyone in riot gear, so not really. Actually, the jingle was so successful that it was reworked into a full length song and became a hit on the Billboard charts.

I’m going to end this by recalling an earlier BEC post from 2016 regarding ethics in marketing.

In that post, we outlined a few steps on how to be ethical in marketing: Do the research, Be objective, Be the good, and Get better. We can also cull one other lesson in marketing the Heineken ad: Take the time to get it right. This is doubly true if you’re using a societal issue to spread specific message.

 

How Hiring A Caterer Made Me Better At My Job

hiringacatererSome of you may or may not know I’m getting married this year. And even though I’m holding a small wedding, there is some coordination that needs to happen.

For me and Derrick, the two most important things to spend our money on were 1) food and  2) photography.

While other things are also important, food is something everyone who attends the event will experience… plus Derrick and I like to eat. We knew it was going to take up a large majority of our wedding budget.

As someone who’s never planned a large event before, it was a very enlightening experience to spend a good amount of money on something I didn’t completely understand but know I need.

I now get how most of you feel hiring a web professional.

Here’s what I learned along the way.

I judged people based on their websites.

I was told there was a very good but very expensive caterer… which I had a hard time believing when I went to the website. The large format pictures were blurry, it was not mobile friendly, and there was no useful information on their site (like sample menus or how much per person could be expected).

Now I may be more web savvy than the average person but all of us have seen enough websites to know when someone looks legit or not. These people looked like they could barely run their business by looking at their website.

I want to tell about half the people I looked at to pony up some funds and get their website looking legit… because they might be leaving a lot of money on the table.

Open ended questions scared the crap out of me.

I’ve NEVER done this before. I have no idea how it works.

With one person I emailed with, they wanted to know what I wanted to know ‘what I had in mind’. Like that was all they asked me.

This put pressure on me to think of what they meant. I had given them the number of people, the day and time, and the approximate vibe I was going for ‘casual buffet style brunch’. What else do they want to know? Did they want a menu? Did they want me to send pictures? I still have no idea.

Having a questionnaire would help me understand what they need to know to quote me. Our eventual caterer had a list of what she wanted from me so that was a much easier initial email to answer.

Other people have thought of the questions you should ask. 

When you are ready to hire someone (you’ve got past that initial stage), you need to be really clear on what you’re getting or not getting.

The great news is wedding websites, blogs, and your friends have great ideas of questions you should ask before you hire someone.

Armed with questions from a Real Maine Weddings checklist http://realmaineweddings.com/, I asked questions of our caterer and got my answers which helped make the decision.

Hire someone you like.

If someone is providing you services, you’ll have to be able to talk with them and have it feel like they are addressing your concerns.

If someone seems pushy, difficult, or otherwise has personal traits that are going to grate on you, that’s a good enough reason not to hire them. Your gut instinct is an important instrument, use it!

So yes, hiring a caterer was an exciting and terrifying step. Exciting because it means we are closer to our goal, terrifying because we are writing a check to them bigger than a mortgage payment.

Those of you who have hired Breaking Even on some good interactions and faith in us, I thank you. I now understand that feeling better than I ever have and I am lucky to have you.

And to those of you out there providing services and not getting a lot of phone calls or emails, ask yourself:

Does my website look legit and answer some basic questions for potential customers?
Do I have a list of questions I need answered to give a proper quote/follow-up answer to frame the discussion?
Am I prepared to answer the basic questions other people have told my potential customer to ask me?
Could a personal trait be holding me back?

Nicole runs Breaking Even Communications, an internet marketing company in Bar Harbor Maine. When she’s not online, she enjoys walking her short dog, cooking with bacon, and trying to be outdoorsy in Acadia National Park.

Marketing Monday: Unnamed Animal Shelter

Every Monday, a post about websites, web promotions, and how to do it well. Let me know if you have an idea!

I was going to write about something else entirely until the task of transporting 25 pounds of cuteness consumed my life.

To be clear, let’s take a look at what all this work has been for:

Corky the Corgi mix, whose life and name will forever be awesomer, if I could just get her within 250 miles of me.

*Sigh* Ok, that was helpful. And gives this whole situation perspective.

Regular readers may be aware that I had to put my dog down in January. She was 15 years old and I had watched her slow decline for almost an entire year. As someone who lives alone and works at home, I’ve missed the companionship of an animal. And while I am not expecting another Sadie (who was irreplaceable), I know my new dog will add a lot to my life… if only there wasn’t the slightest issue.

Corky the Corgi lives in Georgia. And I live in Maine. (Unrelated: Yes, I am changing her corny little name the second I get her.)

I have spent days investigating how I can get this animal to where I am, and would like to offer the folks who run animal shelters a few tips to help people adopt more animals, as I have been ridiculously patient throughout this process in a way that others might not be.

If you’re going to offer it, be ready to know what that entails, and how much it costs.

On the front page of the shelter’s website, they say transport is available to the northeast. The transporter I talked to (an affiliate of but not exactly connected to the shelter) could only get my dog to Rhode Island. Last I checked, there is still a lot of the northeast to go after RI.

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Nicole runs Breaking Even Communications, an internet marketing company in Bar Harbor Maine. When she’s not online, she enjoys walking her short dog, cooking with bacon, and trying to be outdoorsy in Acadia National Park.